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. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. inc. you. thank you. >> joining us now to kick off these three nights of this historicon anniversary is the author of "the king years." fromr branch joins us washington. it is good to have you back on the program. >> i have been. talking and getting the message out. let me start with the obvious questions. how does the march on washington ?it into this narrative >> it comes in 1963, when the sees politicsly by the throat because of the demonstrations in birmingham earlier that spring culminating ofthe citizens -- sit in previous years. it led them to call for of march , so 63 was the year of the big rig through to put the civil rights movement at the forefront of american politics. i mentioned a factoid, the notion president kennedy did everything he could to convince that march.have >> he was right to propose the almostights bill was suicidal because democrats had depended on the solid south, and the solid south depended on segregation. innedy was putting all that jeopardy. he was very reluctant. >> what about the fact that the have
the day! ♪ announcer: labor day on pbs kids. hi, neighbor! one little idea... do something nice for your neighbor! is about to become one big celebration: neighbor day. neighbor day! we can do lots of neighborly things for our neighbors. announcer: don't miss this amazing musical event! ♪ you can do something nice for your neighbor ♪ thank you, daniel. it's neighbor day! announcer: it's neighbor day on "daniel tiger's neighborhood" monday, september 2nd on pbs kids or watch daniel any time at pbskids.org. peg: "hello" vo: a girl named peg "of course!" (laughs) peg: "one hundred billion to one. it's like way more than ten!" vo: peg plus cat a new show coming this fall to pbs kids "super why" is funded by: a co-operative agreement of the u.s. department of education and the corporation for public broadcasting's "ready to learn" grant, and by pbs viewers like you. [ female announcer ] fun for everyone makes a family strong. chuck e. cheese's proudly supports pbs kids. [ female announcer ] fun for everyone makes a family strong. at abcmouse.com, we believe that learning is the greatest a
": and the prints on this fish we matched with you, ji-woo. announcer: labor day on pbs kids. hi, neighbor! one little idea... do something nice for your neighbor! is about to become one big celebration: neighbor day. neighbor day! we can do lots of neighborly things for our neighbors. announcer: don't miss this amazing musical event! ♪ you can do something nice for your neighbor ♪ thank you, daniel. it's neighbor day! announcer: it's neighbor day on "daniel tiger's neighborhood" monday, september 2nd on pbs kids or watch daniel any time at pbskids.org. cat: "hold me baaaaaack!" cat: "ha-ha-ha-ha" cat: "oh yeah!" peg plus cat a new show coming this fall to pbs kids (george chattering excitedly) this program was made possible by: we believe that learning and curiosity go hand in hand. abcmouse.com early learning academy, proud sponsor of pbs kids and curious george. abcmouse.com early learning academy, are designed for kids to be as active as their imaginations. all she knows is that, today, purple is her favorite color, and that's good enough for us. stride rite is a proud sponsor of "curio
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> it is a well-worn clichÉ to say that someone doesn't need an introduction. but look at this face. [laughter] does she really need an introduction? i am delighted to have children and on this program. she is a brilliant comedian whose comic antics more than 50 years have entertained us. she has also had, like the rest of us, significant hearted, most particularly with her daughter carrie who, after overcoming addiction lost her battle with cancer. carol has written about that in a courageous new book. carol burnett, as you well know -- and if you don't come and let to you once again -- how delighted i am to have you on this program. >> i am so thrilled to be asked back. -- i hopeddn't think of course the last time you were here that you would come back again. i didn't think you would come back to this book. i went to the day to look at our last precision when you're here for your second memoir. and there is a chapter in that book where you start the chapter oviate forising the carrie. looking at that tape come i can
) yeah! it's electric! it's fresh. announcer: your pbs kids go! friends are ready for anything. ready to fight a little crime? oh, hi! this is a pretty big deal, huh? presto! announcer: and now they're ready for you weekdays on pbs kids go! or anytime you want at pbskidsgo.org. "the electric company" is brought to you by... find your voice and share it, american greetings, proud sponsor of "the electric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. play awesome electric company games and earn points for your favorite person, like me, hector. i mean, i'm your favorite, right? so what are you waiting for? i'm great at telling people what to do. hey kids! pick up that trash. kidding with these, right? hey! (sneezing) bless you! wild kratts is made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. ♪ wild kratts chris: hey, we're creature adventuring in north america. martin: in a really special wild habitat called the sonoran desert. chris: it
to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: we are joined by the director of the king institute. i guess today officially concludes the festivities that have been going on for weeks. what is your sense for how martin has been treated? >> i think it has been great. i think that represents that martin luther king's legacy lives on into the 21st century. >> we have a problem where the majority do not have passports. not get out and see the world. see inside looking out. when one does travel around the world, give me some sense of how is regardedr king around the world. >> you have asked the right question. he is a world figure. he is a symbol for social justice around the world. outsidein a similar way the united states martin luther as ais viewed not just black leader. they recognize he is a symbol for human rights, social justice, and everyone is familiar with i have a dream. they see his dream as symbolic of their own dreams. >> i am not naÏve asking this. resonatednd why it been and why it resonates now. -- why it resonated then and why it resonates now. i get that, but why is it
. ♪ by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. algernon austin is the author of "the unfinished march." good to have you on this program, sir. i want to jump right in, there in-depth you have done research on to give us some sort of portrait of where we are and where we are not, 50 years later. i want to jump right in and go in this particular order. first, these ghettos of poverty. how is it, why is it that 50 years after king tried to ring this bell, poverty is still threatening our democracy? how is it that poverty is now a matter of national security? >> the thing is is that there was some policies that importantly reduced poverty. but our commitment to poverty has really waned over the 70's, 80's, and in recent years. we have allowed a number of prevent all workers firm really sharing in prosperity. for example, one of the demands of the march was for a decent minimum wage. a minimum wage that would be worth today over at $13 an hour. today, the minimum wage is actually worth less than it was in 1963 in inflation-adjusted terms. although minimum-wage work
on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the united states worked today to firm up the intelligence behind claims that syria used chemical weapons and to win support for a possible military strike. meanwhile, a united nations team began wrapping up its own efforts to find out just what happened last week, in a suburb of the syrian capital. outside damascus, u.n. inspectors made a third trip to the site of an alleged chemical weapons attack. collecting samples in gas masks and protective gear, while the u.n. secretary general, ban ki- moon, said their mission is nearly over. he spoke in vie
. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportunit jeervemake no mistake, presidene accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons. >> from secretary of state john kerry, a warning, there is no doubt that it happened. >> the indiscriminate slaughter of civilians, killing of women and children and innocent bystander is a moral on sen tir. for five days syria refused to let the u.n instead it attacked the area further, shelling it and
and kristen and steve and lily and sean and jane; thank you for being apart of this pbs show. and i realize now with all the gay presenters and a lot of you tonight, this could have been on bravo; it easily could have been. different. it's kind of hard to stand on stage and follow all those very, very funny people, you know, to come up after they've spoken. to be honest when they called me and asked who i would like to speak before me i said, "ken burns." that's who i wanted. it would have been easier. thanks to everyone at pbs, i am so happy to be apart of your farewell season; this is wonderful. [audience laughter and applause]. and really, to whoever found all those clips, thank you for sharing them with everyone. what a wonderful trip down memory lane and a little detour down mullet street. that was um. i, of course, want to thank mark twain. is he here tonight? if you see him, thank him. i've never read mark twain, but to be fair he never saw my hbo special; so i guess that's. it's really incredible. when i heard i was going to be getting this award and traveling to our nations capital
and @tothecontrary and visit our website, pbs.org/tothecontrary where the discussion continues. whether you agree or think, to the contrary, please join us next time. >> funding for "to the contrary" provided by: the cornell douglas foundation committed to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation the e. rhodes and leona b. carpenter foundation. and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. for a transcript or to see an online version of this episode of "to the contrary" please visit our pbs website at www.pbs.org/tothecontrary.
, tuesday, august 27, at 9:00 p.m. on most pbs stations. our webcast extra streams live beginning at 8:30 p.m. tonight eastern time and all weekend long at pbs.org/washingtonweek. week one you next "washington week." good night. >> prudential. additional funding is provided thehe annenberg foundation, corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> announcer: the following kqed production was produced in high definition. ♪ >> must have soup! >> the pancake is to die for! [ laughs ] >> it was a gut-bomb, but i liked it. >> good. i actually fantasize, in private moments, about the food i had. >> i didn't like it. >> you didn't like it? oh, okay. >> dining here makes me feel rich. >> and what about dessert? pecan pie, sweet potato pie.
a secret is to never have it. frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. >> smith: in late 2009, an army intelligence analyst stationed in eastern iraq logged onto a classified server. >> you see all those people standing down there? >> that's a weapon. >> yeah. >> smith: he opened a file that had been flagged by army lawyers. >> ...have five to six individuals with ak-47s. request permission to engage. >> smith: it was footage taken from a us army helicopter gunship. >> light them all up. >> come on, fire. ( machine gun fire ) >> hey, roger! ( machine gun fire ) >> keep shootin
." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: president obama expressed heightened concern about the situation in syria in his first extended remarks about the possible use of poison gas by the syrian government. his comments came as the humanitarian crisis there hit what the u.n. called a shameful milestone. and a warning, some viewers may find images in this story disturbing. the president said today that wednesday's alleged chemical attack outside damascus, which killed between 500 to more than a thousand men, women and children, was quote, "a big event of grave concern." >> that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has, both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating, as well as needing to protect our allies, our bases in the r
work together, we can snap hunger out. and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. ♪ tavis: it is impossible to overstate the success of "the big bang theory," with its completed just now sixth season. the cbs sitcom regularly draws about 20 million viewers each week, a rare feat in today's multichannel broadcast universe. anchoring the series is johnny galecki. >> hello, sir. tavis: i like saying that -- johnny galecki. >> i like how you say it. tavis: johnny galecki. >> music to my ears. [laughter] tavis: who plays a brilliant but nevertheless sensible physicist, providing an excellent foil to jim parsons' brilliant but clueless sheldon cooper. later this year, johnny galecki [laughter] will be seen in the independent film "cbgb." say that fast three times. let's take a look at a scene, though, from "the big bang theory." >> ok, glasses off. find waldo. [applause] [laughter] hurry up. find him. >> i'm trying. don't you let me. >> he's wearing a hat, glasses, and a red striped shirt. >> there he is. i've got him. >> how could you not find him? >> beca
.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. ♪ tavis: the aggressive take-no- prisoners style of play that defined jimmy connors as a tennis champion is now so taken for granted that it's hard to remember that this working class kid from east st. louis just about redefined how tennis was played. some might say not necessarily for the better, he broke rules, challenged line judges, argued his case. when earlier champions had been praised for their gentleman-like demeanor, connors was all about winning, and he did so with gusto, remaining in the top 10 for 16 years, five as number one, including getting to the semifinals at the u.s. open at the ancient for tennis age of 39. he writes about this and so much more in a wonderful new book, a provocative new book called "the outsider: a memoir." jimmy connors, i am honored, after having watched you so many, many years, to have you on this program. >> good to see you. tavis: good to have you on, man. >> it's a pleasure, thanks. tavis: i was teasing jimmy when he c
-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment you can make in your future. >> suarez: the president unveiled his proposal before a crowd of more than 7,000 at the university of buffalo, in upstate new york. >> at a time when a higher education has never been more important or more expensive, too many students are facing a choice that they should never have to m
hour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> the on to the world we are focused on washington and western capitals today amid rising expectations in an attack on syria is coming soon. the obama administration insisted again there is no doubt the assad regime used chemical weapons last week in a damascus suburb. inside the white house, the emphasis was on laying the legal ground work for a possible military strike in syria. spokesman jay carney pointed out that nearly 190 nations have signed a convention opposing the use of chemical weapons. >> there must be a response. kerry made that clear at the president's instruction and i'm echoing it again today. we cannot allow th
." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: there was a flurry of activity around the world today on what happens next in syria. at the united nations, britain submitted a resolution to the security council condemning syria for an alleged chemical attack, and authorizing the use of force in response. the u.n. envoy to syria, lakhdar brahimi, warned any military action must have the world body's approval. but russia and china appeared likely to use their vetoes, as they have on previous syria resolutions. in turn, u.s. officials made clear that plans for a possible military strike are continuing-- with or without u.n. approval. and in syria, u.n. inspectors returned to the si
person. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the syrian government pounded rebel areas outside the capital, damascus, early today, and antigovernment activists said some rockets included chemical weapons that killed hundreds of people. .(children shouting/crying) women and children shielded their faces with handkerchiefs. while victims-- writhing in pain-- gasped for air,some foaming at the mouth. these amateur videos-- all posted on social media websites and cannot be independently verified-- showed scores of bodies filling clinic floors and hallways. all showed little signs of visible injuries. one local doctor's account: >> (translated): it is a huge crisis, the number of victims is very high, we have ran out of atropine and hydrocortisone. i have carried in my own hands
education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. ghborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? could you be mine? ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - neigh! neigh! giddy-up! hi, neighbor! i'm playing farm! this is my horse. neigh! and this is my cow. moooooo! say it with me. moooooo! come and play! ba-da-boom, ba-da-boom. o the owl is playing too, see? - neigh! - neigh! farmer daniel is back. and look who came
to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? could you be mine? ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ the land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? - ride along ♪ - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? - ride along ♪ - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in the land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street waiting to greet you ♪ ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - presenting... daniel tiger! ta-dah! ha! ha! ha! today at school, we're putting on a show. and i'm going to sing! ♪ la la la la la la laaaa come see! - ok, everyone, we're ready to start our show! everyone, get ready to show something special you can do. - i'm going to sing a song! ♪ la la la la la la laaaa -
's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. ood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? could you be mine? ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? - ride along ♪ - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? - ride along ♪ - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street waiting to greet you ♪ ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ hi, neighbor! i'm... teacher harriet! welcome to school! - hello, neighbor. are you pretending to be me? - yup, i was pretending to be you, teacher harriet! - well then, i'll pretend to be daniel tiger. grrr! i'm big and strong! (daniel giggles.) - i like pretending. do you? - well, i'm glad you like pretending because i have a surprise to share...
." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment you can make in your future. >> suarez: the president unveiled his proposal before a crowd of more than 7,000 at the university of buffalo, in upstate new york. >> at a time when a higher education has never been more important or more expensive, too many students are facing a choice that they should never have to make. either they say no to college and pay the price fo
dimension. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: president obama expressed heightened concern about the situation in syria in his first extended remarks about the possible use of poison gas by the syrian government. his comments came as the humanitarian crisis there hit what the u.n. called a shameful milestone. and a warning, some viewers may find images in this story disturbing. the president said today that wednesday's alleged chemical attack outside damascus, which killed between 500 to more than a thousand men, women and children, was quote, "a big event of grave concern." >> that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has, both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating, as well as
are against the thought of any attack. >> to restate it here, in a new interview with pbs, president obama is saying that conclusively that syria in his estimation, there is a piece of the interview now, we're going to watch it go through it and i believe we'll be able to use that particular moment when the president says that syria was behind conclusively the attack. >> remember whatever is said doesn't really matter, at the end of the day, if there's to be any kind of military assault of any kind we know it won't be boots on the ground but it could be cruise missiles for example, the final say rests in the white house. >> john terry. appreciate it. >> thank you. >> again let me repeat it. let's roll the tape of the interview, president obama stating to pbs that syria was behind the chemical weapons attack. according to the president, it is not an alleged attack. it is an in fact chemical weapons attack. on a suburb just outside of damascus last wednesday. >> it has been reported that the americans have information which is coming in from israel who were listening in to what was said in s
and around the world. can anything stop a strike in syria. listen to what president obama told the pbs news hour. >> i have no interest in any kind of open-ended conflict in syria, but we do have to make sure that when countries break international norms on weapons like chemical weapons that could threaten us, that they are held accountable. >> so it is just a matter of time and can this country afford to intervene in syria? we' and the jury giving the shooter death. nadal hassan looked at him in the eye and shot him seven times. >> might have strong woords of criticism for president obama. >>> and you heard lora dimaggio tell me this last night about hanna anderson. >> i remember very vividly telling my brother, she's trouble. she's going to -- she's -- i said you need to watch out for that one, she's trouble. >> it was an extraordinary encounter and tonight i want to ask star jones what she thought of that and much more, plus, mom versus miley. the blogger who warns her daughter let miley cyrus be a lesson to you. we'll find out what that lesson is later. >>> we'll begin with the big stor
to punish it for using chemical weapons. he spoke today with pbs who asked him the key question right off the bat. >> how close are you to authorizing a military strike and can you assure the american people that by doing so, given iraq and afghanistan, that the united states will not get bogged down in yet another war halfway around the world? >> well, first of all, i have not made a decision. i have gotten options from our military, had extensive discussions with my national security team. we do not believe given the delivery systems using rockets that the opposition could have carried out these attacks. we have concluded that the syrian government, in fact, carried these out. and if that's so, there needs to be international consequences. >> as for what the consequences might be, the president says he does not foresee an open ended conflict with christmdamascus. >> we want the asaid regime to understand by using chemical weapons against women, against infants, against children, that you are not only breaking international norms and standards of decency, but you're also creating a situa
with pbs' the news hour. >> we have not yet made a decision but the international norm against the use of chemical weapons needs to be kept in place. and nobody disputes or hardly anybody disputes that chemical weapons were used on a large scale in syria against civilian populations. we have looked at all of the evidence and we do not believe the opposition possessed nuclear weapons or chemical weapons of that sort. we do not believe that given the delivery systems using rockets that the opposition could have carried out these attacks. we have concluded that the syrian government carried these out, and if so, there need to be international consequences. we are consulting with allies and international community. i have no interest in open ended conflict in syria. we have to make sure that when countries break international norms that they are held accountable. i think it is important that if, in fact, we make a choice to have repercussions for the use of chemical weapons then the assad regime involved in a civil war, trying to protect itself, will have received a pretty strong signal th
for everyone through contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. hi! i'm mary wilson of the supremes, honey. tonight my music is going to take you back to the time when girls took center stage and share some teenage hopes, heartthrobs, heartaches, and girl power. now, i'm talking about a time when phones were for talking, not texting... when we heard a song on the radio and ran out to buy a record... when we went from pajama parties to our proms, and the songs we sang and felt made us the ladies we are today. it's the greatest girl singers and groups of the 1960s. this is really my music: the '60s girl grooves, and it starts right now, honey, on pbs! ♪
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 164 (some duplicates have been removed)